• Three weeks and counting…

    It’s so close to a performance I’ve been so excited about since this past summer. I am performing Vivaldi’s Summer and Winter with the Central Oregon Chamber Orchestra on December 16th in Bend, and I couldn’t be more stoked. The Four Seasons manages to get better, quirkier, and more fun the more I play it. Not to mention I get to work with a wonderful conductor and good friend, Maestro Gesme. I hope you get a chance to come on by! The deets can be found here: Central Oregon Symphony

  • I try to refrain from online political rhetoric…

    …but I was particularly ecstatic when Portland’s Measure 26-146 passed last night. Bravo to my dear city, and thanks to all who recognized the need for arts in our young citizen’s lives! Details are here: Creative Advocacy Network

  • Recovering from October

    It seems like no matter how many freelancers I talk to, we all share the same horrid months: October and February are by far the busiest and craziest months of the year. There are several good theories as to why everyone schedules things in these two months. One of the most accepted ones is that musical seasons and the school year tend to swim around each other a bit. School starts in early September out here, and giving a month or so for everyone to get used to getting back in the habit of homework, weekly appointments, and figuring out what the heck to practice seems ideal. Also, the full-time…

  • Dr. Paulnack’s welcome address

    I don’t have the pleasure of personally knowing Dr. Paulnack, but I sure am glad I took the time to read these words. I hope you’ll take a few minutes to do the same. http://www.bostonconservatory.edu/music/karl-paulnack-welcome-address

  • It could be great, if not for the playing instruments part…

    There are so many ways this could be good… …except for one thing that Hollywood, through all the years, has failed to recognize: MUSICIANS HATE SEEING NON-MUSICIANS PRETENDING TO PLAY THEIR INSTRUMENTS. This is not meant to be a criticism of the work and training that actors have to go through to play a part that involves a skill they don’t have. (By the way, I wonder how long they took lessons for this movie… six months, maybe? The characters they’re portraying have probably been training for decades, and clearly, THE GAP SHOWS, but that’s neither here nor there.) The point is about good storytelling, which involves being able to…